(9) Ly,Moulthun (2319) - Mikhalevski,Victor (2632) [C30]
Gibtelecom Masters 6th Gibraltar (9.28), 30.01.2008
[Saunders, John]



1 e4 e5 2 f4
[The King's Gambit is always a crowd pleaser.]

2 ..Bc5 3 Nf3 d6 4 c3 Nf6 5 fxe5 dxe5 6 Nxe5 0-0 7 d4 Nxe4 8 Qd3
[8 dxc5? Qxd1+ 9 Kxd1 Nf2+ 10 Ke1 Nxh1 looks tempting (with a view to trapping the h1 knight) but Black can generate counterplay against the king.]

8 ..Bf5
[8 ..Qh4+ doesn't get Black anywhere: 9 g3 Nxg3 10 Qxg3 Qe4+ 11 Kf2 Qxh1 12 Bh6 g6 13 dxc5 Re8 14 Qf4 Bf5 15 Bc4 Nc6 16 Bxf7+ Kh8 17 Qh4 Qxh2+ 18 Qxh2 Nxe5 19 Bxe8 Ng4+ 20 Kg3 Nxh2 21 Ba4 Ng4 22 Bf4 Rd8 23 Nd2 Rd3+ 24 Nf3 h5 25 Re1 h4+ 26 Kg2 h3+ 27 Kg3 h2 28 Bc2 g5 29 Bxd3 1-0 Bronstein,D-Royset,P/Gausdal 1994.]

9 Qf3 g6 10 Bc4
[10 dxc5 Re8 11 Bf4 Nc6 gives plenty of counterplay for the piece.]

10 ..Bd6 11 g4
[White plays the natural and vigorous move in the position.]

11 ..Qh4+ 12 Kf1 Bxe5 13 gxf5 Nd6 14 Bb3
[14 Bd5 Bg7 15 fxg6 hxg6 16 Bf4 is similar to the game.]

14 ..Bg7 15 fxg6 hxg6 16 Rg1 Re8 17 Be3
[17 Bd2 is a viable alternative as White has already decided on developing the knight via a3.]

17 ..Kf8 18 Bf2 Qh6 19 Na3 Nd7 20 Nb5! Nf6!
[Black, in desperate straits, decides to be brave - or bluff.] [Obviously not 20 ..Nxb5?? 21 Qxf7# ]

21 Nxc7 Re4! 22 Bg3!
[Another good decision. 22 Nxa8 Rf4 gives Black better chances of survival. If 23 Qd3 Nfe4 24 Rg2 Nxf2 25 Rxf2 Rxf2+ 26 Kxf2 Qxh2+ 27 Ke1 Bh6! Black should escape with perpetual check.]

22 ..Nf5 23 Nxa8!
[This time White has to go for it.]

23 ..Ne3+ 24 Ke2
[24 Kf2! is probably better but not easy for the human brain to calculate: 24 ..Neg4+ (it looks more natural to throw in another attacking unit with 24 ..Nfg4+ but it is not so good: 25 Ke2! and Black has to worry about the mate threat on f7) 25 Kg2 Re3 26 Bd6+! - an important intermezzo - 26 ..Kg8 27 Qf1 and, despite the apparent fragility of the white defence, Black has no obvious bone-crusher.]

24 ..Nc4+ 25 Qxe4?
[25 Kd3! is similar but better. After the text, White is on the back foot. After 25 Kd3, 25 ..Re3+ 26 Qxe3 Nxe3 (26 ..Qxe3+ 27 Kxc4 Qe2+ 28 Kb4 and White's king should live to enjoy his material advantage) 27 Rae1 and White should be a bit better.]

25 ..Qd2+ 26 Kf1 Nxe4 27 Bxc4 Qxb2 28 Rd1!
[Only move.]

28 ..Nd2+ 29 Rxd2 Qxd2 30 Bd6+ Kg8
[30 ..Ke8 31 Bb5+ Kd8 32 Rg3 holds things together for White.]

31 Rg3 b5 32 Bb3!
[Avoiding a sneaky trick: 32 Bxb5?! Qc1+ 33 Kf2 Qb2+ 34 Be2 Bxd4+! would gain Black a valuable pawn.]

32 ..b4!?
[White is also dodging some tricks (as he was last move): 32 ..Qxh2? 33 Bxf7+! Kh8 34 Bd5! and Black's king is exposed to attack.]

33 Bxb4 Qxh2
[Having deflected the bishop from d6, the h2 pawn is safely captured.]

34 Rf3 Qh1+ 35 Kf2 Bf6!? 36 Bd5
[Not falling for 36 Rxf6 ... but Fritz thinks White should have gone ahead and taken it anyway! Let's see... 36 ..Qh4+ 37 Ke2! Qxf6 38 Nc7 and the idea is that White's three minor pieces can work together to overcome the lone queen. In truth, it is probably not good enough to win but would be sufficient for a draw.]

36 ..Kg7?!
[Black, rated more than 300 points higher than White, disdains the draw with 36 ..Bh4+ 37 Ke3 Qe1+ 38 Kd3 Qb1+ etc, but it is possible that he is pushing his luck too far.]

37 Ke2 Qh5 38 Bc6 g5 39 Kd3 g4 40 Re3
[Perhaps White could have played on with 40 Rf2 with slightly the better of things, but after this it is drawn.]

40 ..Qf5+ 41 Kc4 Qf2 42 Re4 Qf1+
[42 ..g3 43 Bd6 Qxa2+ 44 Kb5 looks drawn.]

43 Kb3 Qd1+ 44 Kc4 Qf1+ 45 Kd5 Qf5+ 46 Kd6 g3 47 Re2 Qg4 48 Rg2 Bd8 49 Bd5 Kf6 50 Rg1 Qf5 51 Rxg3!?
[Fritz comes up with the ingenious, zugzwang-seeking 51 a3!? after which Black runs remarkably short of useful moves: 51 ..a5 52 Bc5 Be7+ 53 Kc6 Bxc5 54 dxc5 Qe5 55 c4 , etc, but it is hard to believe that White has anything significant. But White's chosen move is equally ingenious.]

51 ..Qf4+ 52 Kd7 Qf5+!
[White had hoped for 52 ..Qxg3? 53 Kxd8 when White's three minor pieces are having all the fun.]

53 Kd6
[53 Kxd8 Qxd5+ 54 Kc7 Qxa8 is also drawn.]

53 ..Qf4+ 54 Kd7
[A very fine game, with plenty of ebb and flow, reflecting well on both players, but particularly the much underrated young Australian.] 1/2-1/2